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  1. ANAHEIM — By having four plate appearances against a pitcher on Wednesday, Shohei Ohtani has reached what Angels manager Brad Ausmus conceded is the “last step” in his rehab as a hitter. “After this,” Ausmus said, “he should be ready.” Ausmus wouldn’t say how much more Ohtani will need, beyond that it will be at least another week of workouts like Wednesday’s, which was Ohtani’s first time facing a pitcher since September. Ohtani faced a right-handed pitcher throwing all his pitches, without Ohtani knowing what was coming. They kept a count as they would in a game. The workout occurred before the ballpark was open to the media, and Ausmus would not give much detail about the session. Ausmus said Ohtani drew two walks, hit one ball that would have been a double into right-center, and another that “might or might not have been a hit.” “He looked good,” Ausmus said. Ohtani will continue having workouts like that until he’s ready to join the Angels, which Ausmus said will be sometime in May. Ausmus said the target is for Ohtani to get “in the neighborhood of 40-ish” at-bats. Ohtani could bat 10 times in a day if the Angels want to do that. Ohtani also played catch again on Wednesday, increasing his distance to 100 feet. He has been throwing three days a week. Ohtani, who had Tommy John surgery on Oct. 1, will not pitch this year. Related Articles Yankees hand Angels their 9th loss in 11 games Angels’ Zack Cozart fortunate to avoid concussion after head-on-knee collision Angels drop wild series opener to Yankees in 14 innings Brian Goodwin earns increased role with Angels Angels get creative, beat Mariners to snap six-game losing streak View the full article
  2. ANAHEIM — For a couple weeks last winter, Jonathan Loaisiga and JC Ramirez trained at a small baseball field in their hometown of Managua, Nicaragua. In the capital city of nearly 1 million people, the two pitchers live half a kilometer apart, Loaisiga said in Spanish. For as large as the baseball world is, it’s still really small. They just missed each other this week when Loaisiga’s Yankees played Ramirez’s Angels. Loaisiga was summoned from the minor leagues to help New York’s injury-depleted bullpen on Monday. The Angels could probably use Ramirez’s help. Their starting rotation has struggled mightily and the team is mired in fifth place in the American League West. But Ramirez is still in Tempe, Ariz., recovering from Tommy John surgery last year. He has yet to pitch to live hitters. Had they reunited, two-thirds of the Nicaraguans in Major League Baseball would have been on the same field for the first time since Ramirez and Loaisiga trained last winter. Red Sox pitcher Erasmo Ramirez is the third member of the trio. A fourth Nicaraguan-born player, infielder Cheslor Cuthbert, is on the roster of the Royals’ Triple-A affiliate. There’s a fascinating wrinkle to this exclusive club. It has nothing to do with quantity and everything to do with quality. A brief history of baseball in Nicaragua is in order. It began competing in the Central American and Caribbean Games, a spring/summer tournament for the top amateurs in each country, in 1935. Dennis Martinez became the first Nicaraguan to reach the majors in 1976 with the Baltimore Orioles. Another 14 have reached the big leagues since. The country hosts a league in the winter too, but it does not attract the top-name talent of its counterparts in the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Venezuela and Mexico. Here’s the interesting part. Only 54 Nicaraguan-born players have played professionally at all according to The Baseball Cube, an online database of pro and college players. Considering 15 of them reached the majors, that’s an astounding accretion rate. “For us, there’s not a lot of players who come out from Nicaragua, so whenever we have an opportunity to play in this league we have that in our mind,” Loaisiga said through an interpreter. “We have to not only get here but set a good example for those kids that are now watching us.” Martinez set a high standard. Before Bartolo Colon won his 246th career game last August, Martinez held the record for most wins by a Latin American pitcher. Nicknamed “El Presidente,” Martinez has loaned his name to two stadiums in Managua. It seems like no coincidence 11 of the 15 Nicaraguans to reach the majors have been pitchers. Pitchers are to Nicaragua as shortstops are to the Dominican Republic. But there’s more to this analogy than a famous role model. Loaisiga wasn’t always a pitcher. Listed at 5-foot-11 and 165 pounds, he doesn’t cut an imposing figure, on a mound or anywhere. “Among other things, when I started playing I used to play the outfield,” he said. “When training turned a little bit more serious, they told me you have a really good chance to become a good pitcher. So the focus changed. I started focusing on pitching, training to become a pitcher. My grandpa used to be a pitcher. It kind of led me in that direction.” The Giants signed Loaisiga when he was 18 years old, but released him after he lost a season to shoulder problems. He was 21 when the Yankees signed him in 2016. A year later, Loaisiga was reportedly throwing in the mid-90s in the instructional league, and the Yankees added him to their 40-man roster to protect him from the Rule 5 draft. Ramirez wasn’t always a pitcher, either. From the time he started playing baseball as a 5-year-old, Ramirez was a catcher and a third baseman before he moved to the mound. Even then, he wasn’t always a natural. Ramirez recounted the story of meeting Edgar Rodriguez, the first professional scout who saw him pitch. “He told me at the time, ‘forget about baseball, go back to school and try to get degrees and stuff because you’re not going to play baseball.’ I was younger, skinny, didn’t throw hard,” Ramirez said. That was almost 16 years ago, but Ramirez recalls the moment vividly. He was 14 years old. “Now kids 15, 16, they are ready to sign,” he said. “When I was 16, I was throwing 83-to-86. Seattle gave me a chance. Three months later I was throwing 93. I don’t know how. They gave me a chance. That gave me confidence.” Related Articles Chris Taylor’s struggles could change Dodgers’ left-field look – but not yet, Dave Roberts says Angels remove struggling Cody Allen from closer role Angels’ Shohei Ohtani faces live pitching for the first time in rehab Yankees hand Angels their 9th loss in 11 games Kenta Maeda roughed up early, Dodgers never recover in loss to Cubs Ramirez has a theory about why so many of his countrymen who sign minor-league contracts eventually reach the majors. For one, he said, Nicaragua is a third-world country. Money is scarce. Those who commit to training for a sport – only boxing is more popular than baseball there, Ramirez said – do so with a purpose. Since there aren’t that many baseball players to see, there aren’t many scouts there to sign them. Lastly, well, “what can I say,” Ramirez said, pausing. “We don’t have the kind of baseball players MLB is looking for. We’re short and kind of chubby. I’m tall. My mom is Nicaraguan and my dad is Cuban. I’m different. … Vicente Padilla is kind of tall. Dennis Martinez is tall too, and skinny. But the other guys, you see they’re short and eventually we’ll get fat. That’s just the way we are. “You see a kid from the Dominican at 16, and you see a Nicaraguan, they’re way different,” Ramirez said. “We really have to try. You’re not going to find power in Nicaraguan hitters. That’s why you mainly have pitchers. You don’t find a hitter with power, or with muscles.” When you’re left to carry the banner for an exclusive club, that banner can get heavy. Ramirez and Loaisiga would love to see their club grow. Mostly, they lead by example, and maybe that’s enough. If Ramirez (who’s 6-foot-5) and Loaisiga (5-10) can both make it, that leaves a lot of room for new members in between. View the full article
  3. The Yankees’ Brett Gardner, right, is tagged out at home by Angels catcher Kevan Smith during the seventh inning of Tuesday’s game at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Brett Gardner #11 of the New York Yankees connects for a triple as Jonathan Lucroy #20 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim looks on during the third inning of a game at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) Sound The gallery will resume inseconds New York Yankees’ Brett Gardner is safe past Los Angeles Angels third baseman David Fletcher after a triple during the third inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) New York Yankees’ Brett Gardner celebrates after his triple against the Los Angeles Angels during the third inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Chris Stratton #36 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim looks on after allowing a triple to Brett Gardner #11 of the New York Yankees during the third inning of a game at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) New York Yankees starting pitcher Domingo German throws against the Los Angeles Angels during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim grounds out during the third inning of a game against the New York Yankees at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Chris Stratton throws against the New York Yankees during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) New York Yankees’ Thairo Estrada is forced out at second by Los Angeles Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons, trying to advance on a ball hit by Tyler Wade during the second inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Wade was safe at first. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) New York Yankees’ Luke Voit watches his home run against the Los Angeles Angels during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) New York Yankees’ Luke Voit, left, celebrates after his home run with Gleyber Torres during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) New York Yankees’ Mike Ford watches his two-run home run against the Los Angeles Angels during the fifth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Mike Ford #36 of the New York Yankees reacts to hitting a two-run homerun during the fifth inning of a game against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Chris Stratton #36 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim looks on after allowing a two-run homerun to Mike Ford #36 of the New York Yankees during the fifth inning of a game at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) New York Yankees’ Mike Ford celebrates in the dugout after scoring on a ball hit by Tyler Wade during the third inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Luke Voit #45 of the New York Yankees reacts to striking out as umpire Bill Welke and Jonathan Lucroy #20 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim look on during the third inning of a game at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) Los Angeles Angels center fielder Mike Trout can’t get a glove on a double by New York Yankees’ Brett Gardner during the seventh inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Brett Gardner #11 of the New York Yankees reacts after hitting a double during the seventh inning of a game against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) Los Angeles Angels’ Justin Bour watches his grand slam against the New York Yankees during the eighth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Justin Bour #41 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim reacts to hitting a grand slam as Austin Romine #28 of the New York Yankees looks on during the eighth inning of a game against the New York Yankees at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Justin Bour #41 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim reacts to hitting a grand slam during the eighth inning of a game against the New York Yankees at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) Los Angeles Angels’ Justin Bour rounds the bases after a grand slam off New York Yankees relief pitcher Chad Green during the eighth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Chad Green #57 of the New York Yankees looks on after allowing a grand slam by Justin Bour #41 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim during the eighth inning of a game at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 23: Mike Trout #27 congratulates Justin Bour #41 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim rafter his grand slam during the eighth inning of a game against the New York Yankees at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 23, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) Show Caption of Expand ANAHEIM — On April 23, 2002, the Angels lost their fourth consecutive game, leaving their record a dispiriting 6-14. Only two teams in franchise history had a worse record on April 23, and neither of them went on to win a World Series. Of course, the 2002 Angels could not know their destiny in April. They were staring at six months’ worth of unturned pages. The Angels found themselves in a similar place Tuesday after a 7-5 loss to the New York Yankees, their ninth loss in their last 11 games. It’s too soon to declare the season a wash. By win-loss percentage, the Angels are performing no worse than their championship-winning forebears on the same date. Yet it’s quickly become too late to expect their injured stars – Shohei Ohtani, Justin Upton, Andrew Heaney, Tyler Skaggs, et. al. – to be the ones to rewrite history. Many of the Angels’ 25 active players have simply underperformed for too long. On a night when his lineup left no room for error, starting pitcher Chris Stratton (0-2) allowed four runs in five innings. His 7.04 earned-run average is the fifth-worst among all qualified starters. The Angels were trailing 4-0 when Stratton threw his final pitch. Stratton was acquired in a March trade with the Giants for Williams Jerez. The affable Mississippian hasn’t missed a start since. It’s fair to wonder if that will change after this weekend, when Skaggs is expected to return from a left ankle sprain. Stratton’s next start is scheduled for Sunday in Kansas City. Tuesday, there was plenty of blame to spread around. The Angels were 0 for 7 with runners in scoring position until Justin Bour hit a grand slam against Chad Green in the eighth inning. That slashed the deficit from 7-1 to 7-5 and resuscitated the announced crowd of 38,016 at Angel Stadium. Luis Cessa jogged in from the Yankees’ bullpen to face the next hitter, Andrelton Simmons, and induced a catchable fly ball. Brett Gardner tracked it down in deep right-center, only to let the ball pop out of his glove on the warning track. Suddenly Albert Pujols walked to the plate representing the tying run. Cessa walked Pujols on four pitches, bringing up Brian Goodwin as the potential go-ahead run. As quickly as genuine drama materialized, the moment passed. Goodwin, a left-handed hitter, waved at a 2-and-2 slider from Cessa, a right-handed pitcher. The next batter, Kevan Smith, grounded into a routine double play to end the inning. Four of the Angels’ eight hits, and four of their five runs, came in the bottom of the eighth inning. Zach Britton pitched a 1-2-3 ninth inning. Only three Angels hitters had ever stepped into a batter’s box against Yankees starter Domingo German (4-1) before Tuesday. Clips from German’s previous start against the Royals looped on the Angels’ clubhouse televisions before the game, as is custom, but his repertoire seemed Greek to them. German, a lithe right-hander from Santo Domingo, kept the Angels off-balance with a steady dose of curveballs, changeups, and low-90s fastballs. He pitched into the seventh inning, allowing only two extra-base hits – both on Goodwin doubles – and four hits total. Related Articles Angels’ Zack Cozart fortunate to avoid concussion after head-on-knee collision Angels drop wild series opener to Yankees in 14 innings Brian Goodwin earns increased role with Angels Angels get creative, beat Mariners to snap six-game losing streak Angels open a new pitching experiment with Hansel Robles, Jaime Barría The Angels scored their only run against German in the fifth inning. Goodwin led off with a double to left-center field. With one out, Tommy La Stella hit a chopper up the first-base line, but German couldn’t field the ball cleanly. Goodwin went to third on the error. The next batter, David Fletcher, hit a ground ball to third base and Goodwin scored. When he wasn’t playing defense, Gardner was a thorn in the Angels’ side. He finished 4 for 5, a home run shy of the cycle. Luke Voit hit a pair of solo home runs – one against Stratton, another against Sam Freeman, a left-handed reliever making his Angels debut. Stratton also allowed a two-run home run to Mike Ford, the first of his career. Fletcher went 2 for 4 as the Angels’ number-9 hitter. Mike Trout went 0 for 2 with two walks. More to come on this story. View the full article
  4. ANAHEIM — Angels infielder Zack Cozart knew he wasn’t concussed Monday night. He knows what a concussion feels like. His 12th-inning collision at second base, when he lost his helmet and slammed head-first into D.J. LeMahieu’s knee, did not result in a concussion. Ultimately the injury looked worse than it was. Cozart jammed his neck and left the game feeling stiffness and a headache. Although he wasn’t in the lineup for Tuesday’s game against the Yankees, Cozart was able to avoid the 10-day injured list. Cozart loaned his second baseman’s glove to teammate Peter Bourjos – which Bourjos then used to make a diving stop on a ground ball in the 13th inning, his first defensive inning outside the outfield. Meanwhile, Cozart remained inside Angel Stadium for a couple of hours while he was observed by a team doctor for concussion symptoms. “I kept getting better and better,” he said. “My headache was going away. I slept fine. Saw a doc this morning. Everything was good.” As for the concussion, Cozart described it as a “super-weird situation.” “I was in low-A,” he said. “I was on deck, telling a kid to get down – on a base hit he was trying to score. I wasn’t even paying attention to the throw. I was telling him to get down, and the guy air-mailed (the throw), hit me in the head. That one rung my bell. I was done. … That one got me. That one messed my vision up and everything. It took me a while to get back from that one.” BULLPEN SHUFFLE The Angels optioned Luke Bard and Taylor Cole to Triple-A Salt Lake after Monday’s 14-inning loss. The two pitchers combined to throw the final five innings against the Yankees. Right-handed reliever Justin Anderson was recalled from Salt Lake and right-hander Sam Freeman was added to the 40-man roster. In a corresponding move, outfielder Justin Upton was transferred to the 60-day injured list. Upton (turf toe) is walking without the aid of a protective boot, but he did not project to return within the season’s first 60 days. Anderson threw 5-2/3 scoreless innings in his first stint with the Angels. Only five of the 22 batters he faced reached base before he was optioned to Salt Lake on April 8. Related Articles Angels drop wild series opener to Yankees in 14 innings Brian Goodwin earns increased role with Angels Angels get creative, beat Mariners to snap six-game losing streak Angels open a new pitching experiment with Hansel Robles, Jaime Barría Angels allow 4 homers to Mariners and drop 6th straight game Freeman, a 31-year-old lefty, is a veteran of 263 games with the Cardinals, Rangers, Brewers and Braves. He pitched a career-high 63 games last season with Atlanta, going 3-5 with a 4.29 ERA. He throws a split-fingered fastball in addition to his two-seam and four-seam fastballs. The Braves released Freeman on March 22, toward the end of spring training. He signed a minor league contract with the Angels six days later. Freeman allowed nine hits, three runs, six walks and struck out seven batters in nine innings (five games) with Salt Lake. He becomes the only left-hander in the Angels’ bullpen. ALSO Pitcher Tyler Skaggs (sprained left ankle) threw a 40-pitch bullpen and took part in fielding drills. Afterward, he told Ausmus “I’m ready to roll.” Skaggs is likely to rejoin the Angels’ rotation Friday, Saturday or Sunday in Kansas City, but Ausmus was not ready to say which game Skaggs might start. … Upton hasn’t been cleared to run yet, Ausmus said. … Shohei Ohtani’s first live batting practice is “probably imminent-ish,” Ausmus said. UP NEXT Angels (RHP Felix Peña) vs. Yankees (LHP CC Sabathia), Wednesday, 7 p.m., Fox Sports West, 830 AM View the full article
  5. Angels starting pitcher Matt Harvey throws to the plate during the first inning of Monday’s game against the Yankees at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) New York Yankees’ Kyle Higashioka, right, scores on a sacrifice fly hit by Gleyber Torres as Los Angeles Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy, left, loses the ball during the third inning of a baseball game Monday, April 22, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Sound The gallery will resume inseconds The Yankees’ Kyle Higashioka slides home safely after a sacrifice fly by Gleyber Torres, not pictured, as Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy is unable to handle the throw during the third inning of Monday’s game at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) Angels starting pitcher Matt Harvey throws to the plate during the first inning of a baseball game against the New York Yankees, Monday, April 22, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) New York Yankees’ Luke Voit, right, runs to first as he hits a solo home run while Los Angeles Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy looks on during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, April 22, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) New York Yankees’ Luke Voit claps as he scores after hitting a solo home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels, Monday, April 22, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) New York Yankees starting pitcher J.A. Happ throws to the plate during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels, Monday, April 22, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Los Angeles Angels’ Jonathan Lucroy, right, is congratulated by Kevan Smith after hitting a two-run home run during the second inning of a baseball game against the New York Yankees, Monday, April 22, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) The Angels’ Mike Trout has words with umpire Mike Everitt after striking out looking during the sixth inning of Monday’s game against the Yankees at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) The Angels’ Albert Pujols throws his bat after striking out to end the sixth inning of Monday’s game against the Yankees at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) The Angels’ Jonathan Lucroy, left, is tagged out by Yankees relief pitcher Tommy Kahnle as he runs to first base during the 10th inning of Monday’s game at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Yankees relief pitcher Aroldis Chapman throws to the plate during the 12th inning of Monday’s game against the Angels at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) The Angels’ Zack Cozart is attended to at second base by a trainer, left, and Manager Brad Ausmus after being injured during the 12th inning of Monday’s game against the Yankees at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) The Angels’ Mike Trout shows his frustration after striking out as Yankees catcher Kyle Higashioka throws the ball back to his pitcher during the 13th inning of Monday’s game at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 22: Albert Pujols #5 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim reacts to striking out to end the 13th inning during a game against the New York Yankees at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 22, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images) Show Caption of Expand ANAHEIM — The Angels got an encouraging start from Matt Harvey, impressive work from most of their bullpen, a clutch hit from Brian Goodwin and even a diving stop from Peter Bourjos in his professional debut at second base. It wasn’t enough for a victory, though. The Angels lost 4-3 to the New York Yankees in 14 innings on Monday night, with the go-ahead scoring in an inning extended by catcher Jonathan Lucroy’s bad throw to first after a strikeout. It set the stage for Gio Urshela’s RBI single in the 14th against losing pitcher Luke Bard, who ended up striking out four in the decisive inning. The game then ended with pitcher Trevor Cahill striking out, with the Angels out of position players and having had to forfeit their DH. It was the Angels’ seventh loss in eight games. It was the fittingly odd ending to a game that included a little of everything. Harvey bounced back from three straight rough outings to throw six innings, allowing just two runs, but he left in a 2-2 tie and there would be chapters of drama to follow. The Angels bullpen did not allow a hit for five innings until the Yankees finally dented Taylor Cole for a run in the top of the 12th. In the bottom of the inning, the Yankees dominating left-handed closer Aroldis Chapman was on the mound. Kevan Smith led off with a single and, two outs later, Goodwin dumped a single into center field, driving home Bourjos with the tying run. In between, Zack Cozart got hurt sliding back into second base. Cozart’s helmet came off on his head-first slide and he appeared to injure his head slamming into the loose helmet. The Angels were out of position players at the time, so Bourjos had to go into the game at second base, his first time as a professional playing any position but outfield. Bourjos then made a diving stop in the top of the 13th, going to his left to snag a Brett Gardner grounder, then throwing from his knees to get the out. While Bourjos helped Bard get out of the 13th, Lucroy’s mistake was costly in the 14th. His day had started off much better, with his first Angels homer, back in the second inning. It was all the Angels could muster, while Harvey was handling the Yankees. He allowed two runs in six innings, a marked improvement after three straight bad games that ballooned his ERA to 9.64. Manager Brad Ausmus had maintained confidence in Harvey, saying the quality of pitches suggested improvement was possible. “I think the main thing is the misses have been bad misses, very hitter-friendly misses,” Ausmus said before Monday’s game. “If we can avoid that I think he’ll be in good shape because the raw stuff has been very good.” Related Articles Brian Goodwin earns increased role with Angels Angels get creative, beat Mariners to snap six-game losing streak Angels open a new pitching experiment with Hansel Robles, Jaime Barría Angels allow 4 homers to Mariners and drop 6th straight game Angels pitchers looking to find strike zone more often Harvey had been burned by one bad inning in each of his three bad games, and it looked like that was going to be the third inning this time. After allowing a solo homer to Luke Voit in the first inning, Harvey retired five in a row. But Kyle Higashioka led off the third with a double. After a strikeout, Harvey walked the next two batters, loading the bases with one out. Harvey, however, escaped with minimal damage, and it might have been none. Gleyber Torres hit a fly ball down the right field line. Kole Calhoun caught it and uncorked a strong throw to the plate, on target, but it one-hopped past catcher Jonathan Lucroy’s glove as Higashioka slid home. After that, Harvey gave up just one single. The Yankees hit a few balls hard, including a Voit 109-mph line drive to shortstop Andrelton Simmons, but Harvey got outs. He retired the last seven batters he faced, finishing six innings. More to come on this story. View the full article
  6. ANAHEIM — Brad Ausmus stuck with one of his platoons, but not the other, on Monday night. The Angels manager picked left-handed hitting Brian Goodwin to face Yankees lefty J.A. Happ instead of slumping right-hander Peter Bourjos. It was the first time this season that Bourjos had not started against a lefty. Ausmus said that Goodwin, who had two hits against a lefty on Saturday night and an overall average of .346, had deserved the increased the role. “I think he’s earned his way to an opportunity against left-handed pitching,” Ausmus said. Bourjos started on the bench with his .103 average through 39 at-bats. Zack Cozart, however, still started at third, even though he was hitting .102 through 59 at-bats. The Angels could have put David Fletcher at third and Tommy La Stella at second. Ausmus opted to keep the left-handed hitting La Stella on the bench, despite his two homers on Sunday. The decision was also a vote of confidence for Cozart, who Ausmus said has been swinging better than his recent results. Cozart’s hard-hit rate, according to FanGraphs, was just 25.9 percent through April 12. In the next nine games, it’s been 47.6 percent. His six hardest-hit balls of the season have all come in that span, although only three of them have been hits. “The last week or so I’ve felt really good,” Cozart said Monday. “I’ve been working. I’ll keep doing it. I’ll keep going out there and hopefully keep hitting the ball hard and just find some holes. Early in the year, I hit a couple balls hard but it wasn’t consistent. This week it’s been pretty consistent that if I got a good pitch and swung at a good pitch, I was hitting it good. I haven’t struck out a lot (13 times in 64 plate appearances). The last week or so I haven’t been finding any holes.” Cozart said it’s a mental struggle to remain confident in what he’s doing, even as he sees his batting average sink. Related Articles Angels get creative, beat Mariners to snap six-game losing streak Angels open a new pitching experiment with Hansel Robles, Jaime Barría Angels allow 4 homers to Mariners and drop 6th straight game Angels pitchers looking to find strike zone more often Angels come back on Mike Trout’s homer, but come up short again “It’s super easy to be results-oriented and to a certain extent, I am,” he said. “If I was 3 for 3 with three bloop hits, I’d be like ‘Oh, I feel great.’ If I was 0 for 3 with three lasers, I’d be like ‘Oh, what do I need to do?’ You have to fight real hard to not fall in that trap. The odds tell you, the harder you hit it, the better chance you have to get a hit.” ALSO Shohei Ohtani is getting closer to being ready for the first live batting practice in his rehab, but it didn’t happen on Monday and Ausmus “don’t expect him to do it tomorrow either.” Live batting practice is the final step for Ohtani before he can return to the lineup, which the Angels have said will happen sometime in May. … Tyler Skaggs is scheduled for a second bullpen session to test his ankle on Tuesday. Skaggs could return to the rotation a few days after that, if he passes that test. … Andrew Heaney is expected to throw a bullpen session this week, although Ausmus wasn’t sure what day. Ausmus said Heaney “kind of has to start over at this point,” which likely means at least a month of rehab from the time of his first bullpen session. UP NEXT Angels (RHP Chris Stratton, 0-1, 7.00) vs. Yankees (RHP Domingo German, 3-1, 2.37), Tuesday, 7 p.m., Angel Stadium, Fox Sports West, 830 AM View the full article
  7. ANAHEIM – The absence of Justin Upton and Shohei Ohtani loomed large over the Angels all week. It was a convenient if not always accurate excuse for six consecutive losses, their longest drought in a season still not old enough to crawl. In the spirit of making do with what you’ve got, Manager Brad Ausmus […] Seattle Mariners’ Edwin Encarnacion throws his batting gloves after striking out against the Los Angeles Angels during the third inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Sunday, April 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) Sound The gallery will resume inseconds Los Angeles Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons, left, tags out Seattle Mariners’ Tom Murphy during a rundown during the second inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Sunday, April 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) Seattle Mariners’ Ryon Healy gets out way the way of an inside pitch during the second inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels in Anaheim, Calif., Sunday, April 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Hansel Robles throws against the Seattle Mariners during the third inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Sunday, April 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) Los Angeles Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons, right, tosses the ball after Seattle Mariners’ Domingo Santana was tagged out trying to stretch a single into a double during the sixth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Sunday, April 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Mike Leake throws against the Los Angeles Angels during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Sunday, April 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) Show Caption of Expand ANAHEIM – The absence of Justin Upton and Shohei Ohtani loomed large over the Angels all week. It was a convenient if not always accurate excuse for six consecutive losses, their longest drought in a season still not old enough to crawl. In the spirit of making do with what you’ve got, Manager Brad Ausmus got creative Sunday. Pitcher Hansel Robles started a game for the first time since he was in Double-A. Utility infielder Tommy La Stella was the designated hitter. The Angels made all the routine plays on defense, and added a couple spectacular plays for good measure, en route to an 8-6 win. The Angels rapped out four home runs and 11 hits in support of Jaime Barría, who swapped places with Robles as Ausmus deployed an “opener” strategy for the first time this year. After cruising to an 8-1 lead, they held on for dear life as their bullpen allowed three homers and five runs in the ninth inning to make the game close. La Stella, taking his first turn as the Angels’ DH in place of Ohtani, hit his fifth and sixth home runs of 2019. Backup catcher Kevan Smith hit his first. Brian Goodwin, who’s hitting .346 in Upton’s stead, hit his third. The Angels never trailed before the announced crowd of 34,155 at Angel Stadium. They had not led at any point in a game since flying home from Texas early Thursday morning. Robles pitched a scoreless first inning. Barría scattered four hits and did not walk a batter over five innings, allowing one run. Ty Buttrey threw a scoreless seventh. Noe Ramirez threw a scoreless eighth inning before allowing home runs to Tom Wilson and Dee Gordon in the ninth. Cody Allen allowed a two-run home run to Mitch Haniger before giving way to Luis Garcia, who got Edwin Encarnacion to fly out to end the game. The Angels jumped on Mariners starter Mike Leake (2-2) for four runs in six innings. They were leading 4-1 in the seventh inning when Shawn Armstrong walked Mike Trout intentionally with first base open and Justin Bour on deck. Bour, 0-for-4 to that point in the game, singled to drive in a run. The next batter, Andrelton Simmons, hit a double for the fifth consecutive game, scoring Trout. La Stella’s second homer of the game, and an RBI double by Kole Calhoun, drove in two more runs against R.J. Alaniz in the eighth inning. The fifth-place Angels (9-13) are separated by 3 ½ games from first-place Seattle (16-9) in the American League West. They host the New York Yankees for four games beginning Monday. After a scoreless first inning, Leake walked Goodwin on four straight pitches to begin the second. The next batter, Smith, turned on an 0-and-1 fastball for a homer, which glanced off the top of the wall in center field. The Angels led 2-0. The Mariners answered quickly. With two outs in the third inning, Mitch Haniger crushed a slider from Barría to left-center field for a double. Domingo Santana was up next. The first pitch he saw had barely left Barría’s hand when Santana lined the ball back to the mound. Barría was fortunate to avoid being hit by the ball, which sailed into center field for a single. Haniger scored easily on Santana’s single and the Angels led 2-1. Related Articles Angels open a new pitching experiment with Hansel Robles, Jaime Barría Angels allow 4 homers to Mariners and drop 6th straight game Angels pitchers looking to find strike zone more often Angels come back on Mike Trout’s homer, but come up short again Shohei Ohtani takes BP with Angels teammates, moves closer to return The Angels needed some alert glove work to keep it close. Ryon Healy was on third base and Wilson on second when Gordon hit a fly ball to right field with one out in the second inning. Calhoun threw to Bour, the cutoff man. Healy did not attempt to tag up and score, but Wilson inexplicably wandered down the line toward third base. When Bour spun the ball to second base, Simmons tagged Wilson out to complete an inning-ending double play. In the sixth inning, Calhoun threw directly to Simmons to retire Santana trying to stretch a single into a double. In the seventh inning, Dan Vogelbach hit a hard ground ball to the shortstop. Simmons recovered his own bobble with his bare hand to throw out Vogelbach by a step. More to come on this story. View the full article
  8. ANAHEIM — On Saturday night, Angels manager Brad Ausmus informed Scott Servais, his counterpart in the Mariners’ dugout on Sunday, that he was replacing his scheduled starting pitcher with an “opener.” Jaime Barría moved to the bullpen for a day. Hansel Robles got his first career start in his 235th career game. Servais’ reaction? It wasn’t much of one. “No change” to the lineup, Servais said. “When the ‘opener’ stuff comes out, we’ve all dealt with it in the past. We’re going to play our lineup the same. We did see a few (last year). Obviously, when you play Tampa, they were the first ones on it and doing it regularly. We saw a few last year.” The Rays, in fact, introduced the word “opener” to the baseball lexicon in Anaheim when Sergio Romo tossed 1-1/3 scoreless innings against the Angels on May 20, 2018. It was the first of five starts Romo made in 2018 – his first in a career that began in 2008. Another Rays pitcher, Ryne Stanek, started 29 games and pitched 66-1/3 innings. The Rays went 68-49 from May 20 onward. A trend was born. Now, with the Angels starters struggling, Ausmus said the “opener” has a chance to catch on with the Angels. “I think it’ll be definitely used as a tactic again,” he said. “We haven’t really discussed any other time past this.” Servais had three right-handed hitters – Mitch Haniger, Domingo Santana and Edwin Encarnacion – penciled into the top of his lineup. Robles, a right-handed pitcher, was a logical choice. He retired the three in order in his only inning. Not every starting pitcher is a candidate to be replaced by an “opener,” Ausmus said. Barría, who began the day with a 5.87 earned-run average, was a good one. “We had been talking about it for a little while,” Ausmus said. “It’s a way to actually extend the starter. The starter doesn’t have to face the top part of the lineup, which is generally the best part of the lineup. When he starts to go through the middle of the lineup a third time it’s more toward the middle or bottom half. That’s the idea. In theory, you can get more use out of your starter.” Robles’ last professional start was on Aug. 26, 2014 for Double-A Binghamton. SKAGGS UPDATE Left-hander Tyler Skaggs threw a 44-pitch bullpen Saturday to test his sprained left ankle. He reported no pain while he was on the mound, but how his ankle responds to downtime remains a concern. Related Articles Angels allow 4 homers to Mariners and drop 6th straight game Angels pitchers looking to find strike zone more often Angels come back on Mike Trout’s homer, but come up short again Shohei Ohtani takes BP with Angels teammates, moves closer to return Angels rally from 8-run deficit only to lose to Mariners 11-10 “If I had to, like, go out there and pitch I could do it,” Skaggs said. “I just don’t know if you can last for 100 minutes by sitting down for 10 minutes between each inning. That’s the things I’m worried about, not the actual pitching.” Ausmus said Skaggs would probably throw off a mound “again in a couple days and then (we’ll) make a decision after that.” Skaggs is eligible to return from the 10-day injured list Tuesday. ALSO Justin Bour started at first base and Tommy La Stella got his fourth career start at designated hitter Sunday. Ausmus said that Pujols is healthy. “I think it’s important that, to keep (Pujols) healthy, there are going to be days we have to give him off,” Ausmus said. … Deck McGuire, who signed with the Samsung Lions of the Korea Baseball Organization after pitching for the Angels last season, threw a no-hitter on Sunday. … UP NEXT Angels (RHP Matt Harvey) vs. Yankees (LHP J.A. Happ), Monday, 7 p.m., Fox Sports West, 830 AM View the full article
  9. ANAHEIM — The Angels’ miserable week continued, with another game of uncharacteristic homers allowed by Trevor Cahill and an offense that came up one big hit short. The Angels lost their sixth straight game on Saturday night, falling 6-5 to the Seattle Mariners. Cahill gave up three of the four homers the Mariners hit, putting the Angels in a hole they could not escape, no matter how many opportunities they had. The Angels had 13 hits and three walks, but they were 2 for 11 with runners in scoring position, and left 10 runners on base. The uphill climb began immediately, when Cahill gave up a homer to Mitch Haniger leading off the game. He gave up another to Daniel Vogelbach in the first, and then a booming 432-foot homer to Edwin Encarnacion in the fifth. A ground ball pitcher throughout his career, Cahill had allowed three homers in a game just four times in the first 212 starts of his career. The last time was in September 2017. Coming into the game, Cahill had a career average of 0.9 homers per nine innings. This season he has allowed eight homers in 26-1/3 innings, a ratio of 2.7 per nine innings. Cahill also had trouble putting hitters away, with Haniger’s homer and a two-run single by Dee Gordon coming on 0-and-2 pitches. While the Angels couldn’t slow down the Mariners at the plate, they did at least keep the game interesting by putting constant pressure on Mariners lefty Yusei Kikuchi. The Angels have not hit lefties well this season, but they scored four runs on 10 hits in five innings in their first look at the Mariners prized free agent from Japan. Andrelton Simmons had three of the hits, running his torrid stretch to 12 for 25. Simmons scored the Angels’ first run when he came home from first on Albert Pujols’ third-inning double down the left field line. It was the 1,992nd RBI of Pujols’ career, which equaled Babe Ruth for fifth on the all-time list, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. Ruth actually has been credited with 2,214, but many of those came before RBIs were recognized as an official statistic in 1920. Pujols later picked up another RBI with a solo homer in the ninth, which cut the Angels’ deficit to 6-5. They had been chasing the Mariners all night, never able to get the game tied. Related Articles Angels pitchers looking to find strike zone more often Angels come back on Mike Trout’s homer, but come up short again Shohei Ohtani takes BP with Angels teammates, moves closer to return Angels rally from 8-run deficit only to lose to Mariners 11-10 Weather wrecks Angels’ flight plans, making for a long night in the clubhouse Down 5-2 in the fifth, they got a run when Simmons doubled and scored on a Jonathan Lucroy single. They got another when Brian Goodwin tripled, driving in Kevan Smith. It was Goodwin’s second hit of the night against a lefty, as he pushes to get more playing time against lefties. So far this season, Peter Bourjos has started against most lefties, but he’s now hitting .103. Although Bourjos had a single, he also popped out with runners at the corners and no outs in the fourth, left the potential tying run on in the fifth and struck out to leave the bases loaded in the seventh. More to come on this story. View the full article
  10. ANAHEIM — The scoreboard shows that Angels pitchers have not delivered what the team had hoped early this season. From Jonathan Lucroy’s perspective, it boils down to something simple. “Really, in general, everyone needs to throw more strikes,” Lucroy said after Félix Peña’s five-inning outing Friday night. “Our starters especially, we need them to get ahead in the count and throw more strikes. They are working on it, and doing their best. But we’ve got to find a way to make it happen.” More strikes would, of course, lead to quicker plate appearances, which would allow pitchers to go deeper in games. The Angels rank 24th in the majors in pitches per plate appearance, which is a side effect of being 24th in strike percentage and 23rd in first-pitch strike percentage. Peña, who has lasted five innings only once, has the lowest strike rate among the Angels’ starters, at 57.5 percent. The major league average is 62.9 percent. Getting the first pitch in the strike zone is always critical for a pitcher. The major league OPS after a first-pitch ball is .847, compared with .610 after a strike. The Angels have allowed an .862 OPS after a 1-0 count, compared with .685 after 0-1. THROW IT BACK Mike Trout came to the defense of a fan who was going to be ejected for throwing the ball back on the field after Omar Narvaez’s homer in the ninth inning Friday. From his position in center field, Trout waved to the security staff, in an effort to allow the fan to stay. “They probably paid some good money to have front-row seats,” Trout said Saturday. “They shouldn’t get kicked out for throwing a ball back. You see that everywhere. I could see if it was something other than a baseball, you have to eject them, but for catching a home run and throwing it back, I don’t see why they should be ejected.” ALSO A day after Justin Bour failed to run on a popup, allowing the Mariners to get a double play, Manager Brad Ausmus would not say how discipline is handled for that sort of mental lapse. “That’s not something that we deal with publicly,” Ausmus said. Bour was not in the lineup Saturday, but he may not have been under any circumstances because the Angels were facing a lefty. … Tyler Skaggs threw a bullpen session and then gave a thumbs-up sign when asked how it went. Skaggs is on the injured list because of a sprained ankle. It is possible he will be activated as soon as Tuesday, the first day that he’s eligible. … Related Articles Angels come back on Mike Trout’s homer, but come up short again Shohei Ohtani takes BP with Angels teammates, moves closer to return Angels rally from 8-run deficit only to lose to Mariners 11-10 Weather wrecks Angels’ flight plans, making for a long night in the clubhouse Matt Harvey suffers third straight rough outing in Angels’ loss Andrew Heaney has continued playing catch. He is expected to get back on a mound sometime in the next week, Ausmus said. Heaney’s rehab has been “all positive so far,” Ausmus said, since Heaney received a cortisone shot a few weeks ago. … The Angels recalled Luke Bard and optioned Dillon Peters, getting another fresh arm for the bullpen. Ausmus said there is nothing wrong with Justin Anderson, who pitched Friday night at Triple-A. “Bard’s been pitching really well,” Ausmus said. “That’s basically it.” … Kole Calhoun was not in the lineup Saturday, getting a routine day off. It allowed Brian Goodwin the chance to start against a left-hander. Goodwin has been platooning with Peter Bourjos, for the most part. Bourjos has slumped, so Goodwin could move toward playing every day. View the full article
  11. The Angels’ Peter Bourjos strikes out with no outs and the bases loaded in the fourth inning of Friday’s game against the Mariners at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 19: Pitcher Felix Pena #64 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches in the first inning during the MLB game against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 19, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images) Sound The gallery will resume inseconds Seattle Mariners’ Jay Bruce hits an RBI single during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels, Thursday, April 18, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. The Mariners won 11-10. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 19: Jay Bruce #32 of the Seattle Mariners hits a solo homerun in the second inning during the MLB game against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 19, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 19: Kole Calhoun #56 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim watches the ball go for a two-run homerun at right field that was hit by Daniel Vogelbach #20 of the Seattle Mariners (not in photo) during the MLB game at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 19, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images) Angels pitcher Felix Pena looks on after giving up a solo home run to the Mariners’ Jay Bruce as Bruce rounds third base during the second inning of Friday’s game at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images) Seattle Mariners’ Jay Bruce is congratulated by teammates after hitting a solo home run during the second inning of the team’s baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels on Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Los Angeles Angels pitcher Felix Pena throws to the plate during the first inning of a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners on Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Seattle Mariners’ Daniel Vogelbach celebrates after hitting a two-run home run during the fourth inning of the team’s baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels on Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Los Angeles Angels’ Justin Bour, right, scores on a sacrifice fly by Zack Cozart as Seattle Mariners catcher Omar Narvaez takes a late throw during the fourth inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 19: Catcher Omar Narvaez #22 of the Seattle Mariners looks to throw to third base as Justin Bour #41 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim scores in the fourth inning of the MLB game at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 19, 2019 in Anaheim, California. Narvaez threw out the runner at third base for the third out. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images) Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Marco Gonzales throws to the plate during the first inning of the team’s baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels on Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 19: Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim hits a two-run homerun to tie the game at 3-3 in the eighth inning during the MLB game against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on April 19, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images) Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout hits a two-run home run during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners on Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Los Angeles Angels center fielder Mike Trout rounds first after hitting a two-run home run during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners on Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Seattle Mariners shortstop Tim Beckham dives for a ball hit for a single by Los Angeles Angels’ David Fletcher during the eighth inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Seattle Mariners shortstop Tim Beckham bobbles a ball hit for a single by Los Angeles Angels’ David Fletcher during the eighth inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Seattle Mariners’ Omar Narvaez points to his dugout as he round first after hitting a solo home run during the ninth inning of the team’s baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels on Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Seattle Mariners’ Tim Beckham, left, and Mallex Smith celebrate after the Mariners defeated the Los Angeles Angels 5-3 in a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) Show Caption of Expand ANAHEIM — Within a span of a few minutes, Angel Stadium went from an electric atmosphere charged with hopes for a dramatic victory to an angry mob lamenting another loss. Cody Allen gave up back-to-back homers in the ninth inning of the Angels’ 5-3 loss to the Seattle Mariners on Friday night, just after Mike Trout had tied the score with a two-run homer in the bottom of the eighth. The Angels have lost five in a row, and the last three have been heartbreaking. On Wednesday in Texas, they had the bases loaded with no outs in the ninth, down by two, but could only score one. On Thursday night they overcame an eight-run deficit to tie the score, but still lost. This time, Trout blasted his sixth homer of the season, a two-run shot in the eighth. As he subtly flipped his bat and headed around the bases, the crowd was rocking and anticipating a victory. Shortly thereafter, things turned sour. An out after Trout’s homer, Albert Pujols was hit by a pitch, putting the potential go-ahead run on base. Justin Bour, who had two hits earlier in the game, hit a high pop-up. Bour did not even run to first, actually turning back toward the dugout while the ball was in the air. The Mariners alertly let the ball drop and turned an inning-ending double play. A few moments after that Allen left two curveballs over the plate – one to Tim Beckham and one to Omar Narvaez – and both ended up over the fence. Allen has converted all four of his save opportunities, but now he’s suffered back-to-back losses when entering in a tie game. While the Angels ended up with a loss, at least they finally did some damage against a left-handed pitcher. Coming into the game, the Angels were hitting .162 against lefties, which was dead last in the majors. Through the first seven innings, the Angels had just one run against Seattle lefty Marco Gonzales, although they had opportunities for more. They loaded the bases with no outs in the fourth, but they scored just one. Peter Bourjos, who is 3 for 35, struck out. Zack Cozart, who is 5 for 52, then hit a line drive to left field, good enough for a sacrifice fly. Jonathan Lucroy was then thrown out trying to go to third on the throw to the plate. David Fletcher sparked the top of the lineup with three hits and a walk, including an infield single before Trout’s blast in the eighth. By tying the score, the Angels took Félix Peña off the hook for a loss, after he’d pitched five innings and allowed three runs, all scoring on a pair of homers. Peña gave up a solo homer to Jay Bruce in the second and a two-run shot to Daniel Vogelbach in the fourth. Both times Peña left pitches over the middle. After the Vogelbach homer, Peña stuck around to get five more outs, making for his longest outing of the young season. More to come on this story. Related Articles Shohei Ohtani takes BP with Angels teammates, moves closer to return Angels rally from 8-run deficit only to lose to Mariners 11-10 Weather wrecks Angels’ flight plans, making for a long night in the clubhouse Matt Harvey suffers third straight rough outing in Angels’ loss Angels’ Kole Calhoun feels good despite another slow start View the full article
  12. ANAHEIM — With his teammates and coaches packed around the batting cage on Friday, Shohei Ohtani was slamming balls over the fence. It’s almost time. After Ohtani’s first batting practice session with his teammates, he expressed excitement about what he’s doing and what he might be doing soon. “I am having fun right now, being able to swing as hard as I can,” Ohtani said through his interpreter. “I wasn’t able to before. I am excited to be back.” Ohtani said the workout was “a lot more fun than hitting by myself,” and he joked that he had been “pretty lonely.” The Angels still aren’t committing to a date for Ohtani’s return, beyond the general statement that it will be sometime in May. Ohtani, who is coming back from Oct. 1 Tommy John surgery, said he’s almost ready. “I need to get a couple at-bats against live pitching first to see where I’m at,” he said. “But as of now, I feel pretty good to go.” Ohtani took 33 swings over five rounds of batting practice. He hit several balls over the fence, most of them to left field. He said going the other way was “by design,” so he could “see where I’m at, where my swing is.” Ohtani said he hoped that his workouts have proven to the front office and medical staff that he’s “healthy and strong. Maybe I can make my return early.” Ohtani is scheduled for live batting practice early next week. How much of that he will do is to be determined. He will not play in the minor leagues, instead hitting in simulated games that will allow him to bat up to 10 times in a session, if necessary. While Ohtani is getting closer, so is the Angels’ scheduled visit to Monterrey, Mexico, for two games against the Houston Astros, May 4-5. “Obviously I am going to aim to be back there, but sooner would be nice,” Ohtani said. CANNING UPDATE Griffin Canning, the Angels’ top pitching prospect, has allowed one run in his first 16 innings at Triple-A this season, with 17 strikeouts and two walks. On Thursday night, he pitched six scoreless innings. General Manager Billy Eppler said Canning has shown good “pitch development and integrity of the tools,” and now they are looking at how his stuff holds up as his pitch-count climbs. A product of Santa Margarita High and UCLA, Canning is expected to be in the majors sometime this season. Related Articles Angels rally from 8-run deficit only to lose to Mariners 11-10 Weather wrecks Angels’ flight plans, making for a long night in the clubhouse Matt Harvey suffers third straight rough outing in Angels’ loss Angels’ Kole Calhoun feels good despite another slow start Rangers blast homers, one off Kole Calhoun’s glove, while Angels go quietly “The stuff is really really good,” Manager Brad Ausmus said. “We just want to make sure he’s prepared to pitch before he comes here. You’ve got to remember this guy hasn’t pitched a lot of professional baseball.” Canning did not pitch the summer after the Angels took him in the second round of the 2017 draft. Last year he rose from Class-A to Double-A to Triple-A, pitching a combined 113-1/3 innings with a 3.65 ERA. ALSO The Angels brought up reliever Taylor Cole and sent down Jake Jewell. Cole had a 2.75 ERA with the Angels last season, but he missed the start of this season with a shoulder problem. … Tyler Skaggs said he is scheduled to throw a bullpen session on Saturday. Skaggs is eligible to come off the disabled list on Tuesday, and he and the Angels were hopeful that he’d be ready then. They will proceed cautiously, though, because last year he came back too quickly from a groin injury and it lingered, spoiling his second half and eventually sending him to the disabled list for a month. View the full article
  13. Chris Stratton #36 of the Los Angeles Angels throws to the plate during the first inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Chris Stratton #36 of the Los Angeles Angels throws to the plate during the first inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Sound The gallery will resume inseconds Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels jogs back to the dugout past Felix Hernandez #34 of the Seattle Mariners after flying out to left in the first inning at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels sits in the before batting in the first inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Felix Hernandez #34 of the Seattle Mariners throws to the plate during the first inning against the Los Angeles Angels at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Omar Narvaez #22 of the Seattle Mariners hits a broken-bat single for an RBI during the second inning against the Los Angeles Angels at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have […] Edwin Encarnacion #10 of the Seattle Mariners wipes sweat from his head while standing on third base during the second inning against the Los Angeles Angels at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Chris Stratton #36 of the Los Angeles Angels walks to the mound as Ryon Healy #27 of the Seattle Mariners rounds third after hitting a three-run home run during the second inning at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have […] ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have […] The Angels’ Brian Goodwin watches as a two-run home run hit by the Mariners’ Ryon Healy clears the fence during the sixth inning of Thursday’s game at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) Brian Goodwin #18 of the Los Angeles Angels flips his bat after striking out looking to end the third inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Manager Brad Ausmus #12 of the Los Angeles Angels chats with pitcher Chris Stratton #36 as he heads into the dugout against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Andrelton Simmons #2 of the Los Angeles Angels rounds third base as he heads home to score on a Albert Pujols single in the the inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Chris Stratton #36 of the Los Angeles Angels in the dugout during their game against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Dee Gordon #9 of the Seattle Mariners turns a double play over Kole Calhoun #56 of the Los Angeles Angels to end the fifth inning at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Felix Hernandez #34 of the Seattle Mariners smiles as Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels jogs back to the dugout after flying out to center in the fifth inning at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Ryon Healy #27 of the Seattle Mariners is greeted at home plate after hitting a two-run home run, his second home run of the game, in the sixth inning against the Los Angeles Angels at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels rounds second as he scores on a Andrelton Simmons double in the seventh inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Tommy La Stella #9 of the Los Angeles Angels hits an RBI single in the seventh inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have […] ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have […] David Fletcher #6 of the Los Angeles Angels rounds the bases after hitting a game-tying home run in the eighth inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) David Fletcher #6 of the Los Angeles Angels celebrates with Kole Calhoun #56 after hitting a game-tying home run in the eighth inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) David Fletcher #6 of the Los Angeles Angels celebrates in the dugout after hitting a game-tying home run in the eighth inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Luis Garcia #40 of the Los Angeles Angels celebrates after pitching the eighth inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Omar Narvaez #22 of the Seattle Mariners rounds the bases after hitting a three-run home run in the seventh inning against the Los Angeles Angels at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have […] Dillon Peters #52 of the Los Angeles Angels throws to the plate against the Seattle Mariners in the seventh inning at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Dillon Peters #52 of the Los Angeles Angels throws to the plate against the Seattle Mariners in the seventh inning at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Jake Jewell #65 of the Los Angeles Angels in the dugout after pitching in the seventh inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have […] ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have […] ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have […] Ruben Alaniz #56 of the Seattle Mariners throws to the plate in the seventh inning against the Los Angeles Angels at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels rounds second as he scores on a Andrelton Simmons double in the seventh inning against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have […] Members of the Angels’ Strike Force launch t-shirts into the stands before the Los Angeles Angels take on the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Show Caption of Expand ANAHEIM — If their game against the Seattle Mariners began at 9:30 p.m., the Angels would’ve been just fine Thursday. Every player and coach could have banked on eight hours of sleep in his own bed, after their weather-delayed flight out of Dallas deposited them in California just before sunrise. Their batting practice could have been spread out over, well, batting practice, as opposed to the first six innings against Felix Hernandez. They could have had it easy. Nothing came easy for the Angels in an 11-10 loss. The game began at 7 p.m. The Angels fell behind 5-0, then 10-2, then their bats awoke right around the two-and-a-half-hour mark. After the Angels tied the score at 10 in the bottom of the eighth inning, closer Cody Allen allowed an RBI single by Jay Bruce in the top of the ninth to give the Mariners an 11-10 lead. In the bottom of the ninth, Roenis Elias closed the door on a 3-hour, 59-minute whirlwind. The Angels have lost four in a row, while the Mariners snapped their own six-game losing streak. Jon Lucroy led off the inning with a routine grounder to third base, where Ryon Healy slid to smother the ball. Healy rose to one foot, hesitated, and threw late to first base – generously ruled a single. But after pinch-hitter Zack Cozart struck out and Peter Bourjos flew out, Elias got would-be hero David Fletcher to ground out to end the game. Fletcher’s second career home run, a solo blast in the bottom of the eighth inning, completed the Angels’ comeback from an eight-run deficit to tie the score at 10. Andrelton Simmons and Tommy La Stella each finished with three hits. Pujols, Kole Calhoun and Peter Bourjos each had two of the Angels’ season-high 16 hits. Pujols drove in two runs. His 1,991 career RBIs moved him one behind Babe Ruth for fifth place on the all-time list. Facing a 10-2 deficit, 11 Angels batted in the seventh inning. Seven scored. When Bourjos hit a ground ball for the third out, the announced crowd of 33,592 at Angel Stadium finally exhaled. The half-inning lasted a half-hour, transforming a 10-2 laugher into a 10-9 nailbiter. In the top of the eighth inning, Seattle loaded the bases against Angels right-hander Luis Garcia on three consecutive walks. Garcia escaped his own predicament by getting Healy to chase a slider and pop out weakly to right-center field, too shallow to score a run. Dee Gordon grounded a ball up the middle, but Andrelton Simmons dove to stop the ball and fed second baseman La Stella for the inning-ending forceout. The Angels clung to their one-run deficit. After allowing the home run to Fletcher, Mariners pitcher Anthony Swarzak walked Calhoun. With two outs, Pujols worked a free pass. Both runners advanced to second and third on a wild pitch. That brought up Brian Goodwin, who worked the count full before swinging and missing at a slider. The Angels’ aggressive endgame strategy contrasted sharply with their effort against Hernandez. In the third inning, Calhoun hit a one-out double and scored on a two-out double by Simmons. Pujols singled, scoring Simmons. Those were their only runs for six innings. Meanwhile, Seattle scored early and often. Angels starter Chris Stratton was charged with six runs in five innings. The Angels trailed 5-2 when Stratton allowed a leadoff single to Omar Narvaez on his 97th and final pitch in the sixth inning. Right-hander Jake Jewell took over and promptly allowed a two-run home run to the next batter, Ryon Healy. Healy was a one-man wrecking crew. Sporting a .218 batting average when the day began, Healy drove in five runs and scored two more from the number-8 spot in the Mariners’ batting order. Number-7 hitter Omar Narvaez hit a three-run home run off Jewell in the seventh inning, in which the Mariners batted around (all nine hitters completed at-bats in the inning). That extended the Mariners’ lead to 10-2. Narvaez drove in four runs and scored three. Of some consolation for the Angels: Seattle’s 1-3 hitters – Mallex Smith, Mitch Haniger and Domingo Santana – finished 2 for 17 with seven strikeouts. Related Articles Weather wrecks Angels’ flight plans, making for a long night in the clubhouse Matt Harvey suffers third straight rough outing in Angels’ loss Angels’ Kole Calhoun feels good despite another slow start Rangers blast homers, one off Kole Calhoun’s glove, while Angels go quietly Brian Goodwin’s hot start has been a boost to Angels Just when the game seemed out of reach, the Angels decided to make it interesting. La Stella led off the seventh inning with a single and scored on a scorching double by Bourjos. That was it for Hernandez, who allowed nine hits and a walk while striking out three. He was charged with four runs, all earned, in six innings. R.J. Alaniz was the first pitcher out of the Mariners’ bullpen. The right-hander struck out Fletcher before the carnage escalated. Calhoun hit a three-run homer to right-center field, bringing the Angels within 10-5. After a quick visit from his pitching coach, Alaniz allowed a single to Mike Trout, an RBI double to Simmons and another RBI double to Pujols. Leading 10-7, Mariners Manager Scott Servais turned to right-hander Brandon Brennan. Brennan walked Brian Goodwin and allowed an RBI single to La Stella. Goodwin went to third, then scored on a wild pitch by Brennan to draw the Angels within 10-9. More to come on this story. View the full article
  14. ANAHEIM — Max Bourjos poked his head in his father’s bedroom Thursday morning. The sun was out, Saturday is his fourth birthday – a big day in a boy’s life – and, in a surprise, Dad was finally home, asleep in bed. He was getting ready for work. About an hour later, Peter Bourjos’ 2½-year-old daughter Charley poked her head in the room. “She fell back asleep with me for like three hours,” Bourjos said, “so that was at least nice.” Bourjos didn’t wake up until about noon, typical for a player in the Angels’ clubhouse Thursday. After their 5-4 loss to the Rangers on Wednesday night in Arlington, a storm front rolled eastward across the Great Plains. At some point, any hope of leaving Globe Life Park on time was dashed. The storm forced the Angels’ team plane to be diverted through Denver. It didn’t leave Dallas until after 3 a.m. Some players weren’t back at their houses in California until 6. In a long season, it was an unusually long night. The game between the Angels and Rangers ended at 10:26 p.m. Central Time in Arlington. With no plane to take them home, all the Angels could do was wait. Players, coaches and staff remained in the visitors’ clubhouse until roughly 2 a.m., hanging on the whims of an unpredictable weather pattern to set them free. They were among the lucky ones. The Dallas Morning News reported that hundreds of flights out of Dallas were suspended Wednesday, and at least 900 area homes were without power. With so much downtime and no place to go, what’s a player to do? Some played card games – blackjack, spades, Texas hold ’em, follow the queens, thirty-one. Others played video games on an Xbox hooked up to the clubhouse television. Halo and Apex Legends were available. Others watched highlights on their phone, or talked, or got social on social media. Noe Ramirez said he browsed various products on the shopping app Fancy, but didn’t buy anything. “I do that a lot, though,” Ramirez said. “I’m always on the apps, always going through stuff, put that in there, looks pretty cool. Then I go to the checkout page and I go, nah, I’m all right.” At one point, catcher Kevan Smith said, players contemplated getting hotel rooms and catching up on sleep in Dallas, then flying home in the morning. It reminded him of a minor leaguer’s schedule. “We all went through it,” Smith said. “It’s not like we’re too good for it. We can still do it.” Mike Trout was less inclined to joke. An avid weather junkie, Trout saw the storm coming long before his teammates hooked up the Xbox. The long night did not catch him by surprise. Trout is already bracing for another possible quagmire – the Angels have a home game next Thursday night, followed by a flight to Kansas City, followed by a game less than 24 hours later against the Royals. Related Articles Matt Harvey suffers third straight rough outing in Angels’ loss Angels’ Kole Calhoun feels good despite another slow start Rangers blast homers, one off Kole Calhoun’s glove, while Angels go quietly Brian Goodwin’s hot start has been a boost to Angels Angels pitchers have rough night in loss to Rangers “It’s not good for – it’s not healthy,” Trout said. “It’s just a tough stretch we’re going through right now. Rest is a big part of the game to keep your body healthy. When you take off from a city at 3:30, it’s tough. “I love weather,” Trout said, “but what it did to us last night … I guess it’s part of it.” INJURY UPDATES Trout tested his strained groin with agility drills on the field prior to Thursday’s game. He served as the Angels’ designated hitter for the fourth straight game. “The verdict was he could play center field,” Manager Brad Ausmus said, “but with the long travel night, we’re going to be cautious. DH him one more day. I fully expect him to play center field (Friday) night.” … Shohei Ohtani will take batting practice with teammates on the field at Angel Stadium for the first time Friday, Ausmus said. There is no target date for Ohtani to face live pitching – the next step in his return from Tommy John surgery on his right elbow. … Tyler Skaggs, on the 10-day injured list with a sprained left ankle, will throw off a mound this weekend, Ausmus said. View the full article
  15. The Rangers’ Asdrubal Cabrera slides home to score as Angels catcher Jonathan Lucroy waits on a late throw during the fifth inning of Wednesday’s game in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images) Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Matt Harvey (33) throws against the Texas Rangers during the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth) Sound The gallery will resume inseconds Texas Rangers starting pitcher Lance Lynn (35) throws against the Los Angeles Angels during the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth) ARLINGTON, TEXAS – APRIL 17: Andrelton Simmons #2 of the Los Angeles Angels first bumps Zack Cozart #7 after scoring in the second inning against the Texas Rangersat Globe Life Park in Arlington on April 17, 2019 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images) Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout (27) prepares to score against the Texas Rangers on a hit by Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons during the third inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth) Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout (27) scores in front of Texas Rangers catcher Isiah Kiner-Falefa (9) on a hit by Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons during the third inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth) Texas Rangers’ Delino DeShields (3) flips his bat after making a fly out against the Los Angeles Angels to end the third inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth) Texas Rangers catcher Isiah Kiner-Falefa (9) visits with starting pitcher Lance Lynn (35) after the base were loaded against the Los Angeles Angels during the third inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth) ARLINGTON, TEXAS – APRIL 17: Andrelton Simmons #2 of the Los Angeles Angels gets the throw ahead of the steal attempt by Elvis Andrus #1 of the Texas Rangers in the second inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on April 17, 2019 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images) Los Angeles Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons (2) prepares to tag out Texas Rangers shortstop Elvis Andrus (1) for the last out of the first inning during a baseball game Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth) Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Matt Harvey (33) is pulled from the game against the Texas Rangers during the fifth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth) ARLINGTON, TEXAS – APRIL 17: Delino DeShields #3 of the Texas Rangers hits a sacrifice bunt to advance the runners against the Los Angeles Angels in the fifth inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on April 17, 2019 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images) ARLINGTON, TEXAS – APRIL 17: Shin-Soo Choo #17 of the Texas Rangers slides into third for two-run triple against the Los Angeles Angels in the fifth inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on April 17, 2019 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images) Angels relief pitcher Ty Buttrey composes himself after allowing a run against the Texas Rangers during the fifth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth) Show Caption of Expand ARLINGTON, Texas — Matt Harvey has not made the kind of first impression he or the Angels had hoped. A promising outing for Harvey ended up as his third straight disappointing game, and the Angels lost 5-4 to the Texas Rangers on Wednesday. The Angels had a chance to overcome Harvey’s rough start, loading the bases with no outs in the ninth, down by two, but they scored just one run. Justin Bour was called out on strikes on a pitch that appeared to be outside, for the first out of the inning. A run scored when Andrelton Simmons grounded into a fielder’s choice at third, then Brian Goodwin struck out. The Angels were swept by the Rangers. They had a 2-0 lead after three innings on Wednesday, having put consistent pressure on Texas starter Lance Lynn, but it all started to go wrong after that. Harvey gave up an unearned run in the fourth and four runs in the fifth, a performance that left his ERA at 9.64 after four games. He has allowed 20 earned runs in 18-2/3 innings. Harvey gave up two runs in six innings in his first start, but he has since had three rough outings. In each of the bad games, he’s mostly been burned by one inning. He gave up five runs in the first inning on April 4, three runs in the second inning on April 9 and then four runs in the fifth on Wednesday. That spoiled what had been, up to that point, an encouraging outing. Harvey faced the minimum nine hitters through three innings, allowing just a single. In the fourth, he gave up an unearned run, with second baseman Tommy La Stella kicking a ground ball with two outs to allow the run to score. Harvey took the mound in the fifth with a 2-1 lead, facing the bottom of the Rangers’ order, and the wheels fell off. Asdrubal Cabrera lined a single on a good slider at the bottom of the zone. Harvey then hung a slider that Logan Forsythe yanked into left field. Isiah Kiner-Falefa dumped a first-pitch fastball into center field, driving in a run. After Delino DeShields bunted to move the runners into scoring position, Shin-Soo Choo turned on an inside fastball and pulled it down the right field line for a triple, ending his night. One more run was added to Harvey’s line when Ty Buttrey gave up an RBI double to Danny Santana, putting the Angels behind 5-2. The Angels could not get those runs back, although there were some encouraging signs from the offense. Andrelton Simmons had his second straight two-hit game. Jonathan Lucroy also had two hits. Zack Cozart had two hard outs and a single. Bour doubled. La Stella, who had hit a flyout with the bases loaded in the third, hit a solo homer in the eighth. More to come on this story. Related Articles Angels’ Kole Calhoun feels good despite another slow start Rangers blast homers, one off Kole Calhoun’s glove, while Angels go quietly Brian Goodwin’s hot start has been a boost to Angels Angels pitchers have rough night in loss to Rangers Angels’ Shohei Ohtani gets positive news from latest check-up View the full article