Dave Saltzer

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Dave Saltzer last won the day on December 15 2017

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About Dave Saltzer

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  1. Great work getting this out. It's nice to see how much this list has improved from just a few years ago. And, hopefully, it will allow us to make some good moves without sacrificing too much to improve the club.
  2. Ettin, A great start to what I'm sure will be another great series with detailed analysis by you. I'm looking forward to reading each one. Keep it up!
  3. Dave Saltzer

    AngelsWin.com Today: An inside pitch on Doug White

    I really enjoyed this. Thanks for sharing the insight. Keep it up!
  4. Dave Saltzer

    OC Register: Angels Offseason Options: J.T. Realmuto

    I don't know about Marsh having more value a year from now than presently. Lots of teams know what we have in Marsh and would love to have him. He has been heavily scouted by lots of organizations. Like you, as much as I like Marsh, I'd be willing to pay that price to get Realmuto. I think this is a great idea by @Jeff Fletcher and a really good way to start of the series. I'm interested to see his other ideas.
  5. Dave Saltzer

    Cool graphic on how each playoff team is contructed

    I think an interesting graphic would be to see how much of each playoff vs. non-playoff team's payroll went to each of those categories. How much are teams overpaying for their homegrown players later in their careers vs. trading vs. signing free agents. Obviously homegrown players may in many ways be cheaper prior to free agency, but, afterwards, may be just as expensive. Additionally, just listing the playoff roster is not a completely fair analysis of how a playoff team was created. Trades and injuries happen throughout the season, so, seeing the total size and depth of a team is very important. Health plays a very substantial role in who does or does not make the playoffs, so, it would be interesting to see how a team made it with all the players who appeared throughout the season as well as the number of players used throughout the season.
  6. It's not that easy for the scouts to just go along with a GM. They are almost all on 1-year contracts, and have their long-term reputations to be concerned about. It's not so easy for them to hitch their star on just 1 GM. If they were just "yes-mean", that's all their career would be. Personally, if I owned a team, I'd more than double my scouting budget, pay top dollar for the best scouts (I'd do the same for the player development people and minor league managers/coaches), and would reap the rewards.
  7. Thanks. In part 2, I will talk a lot more about the process of how trade discussions start and get done, but I can't mention any specific player or teams. Rest assured, the process is in overdrive right now, and large amounts of discussions are happening on an hourly basis.
  8. Ultimately, the GM will be held accountable for all trades or non-trades, to say that the final decision rests solely there is not accurate. Many players have limited trade protection or full non-trade agreements. The deal can be done and the player nixes it. That's not the GM's fault, even if the GM will be held accountable. A deal can be done, but slightly takes the team over on payroll, and it gets nixed by ownership. Or, ownership can override a GM to make a move for a variety of factors other than the most sound baseball decision. The deal can be agreed to in theory, and when medicals are exchanged, the medical staff, which gets additional information won't sign off anymore. Similarly, deals can be close to done and an injury happened in the meantime that makes one team back out or no longer interested in making the trade. The injury might not have to be a part of the trade, but, if an injury to another player forces a team to go in a different direction, that happens. As @JeffFletcherOCR pointed out, there are 30 teams all working to improve, and a new possibility opens up, and one team goes in a different direction. Basically there are so many working and moving parts to any deal, it truly is amazing when they all come together to result in a trade. It's not as easy as so many armchair GMs want it to be, even if they do an extensive analysis to come up with a "fair" trade. While I love reading trade proposals, especially those from @Ettin, and am always checking for Angels rumors, the more it seems that fans need to understand how much more complicated the whole process is of making a trade.
  9. When one group/individual overrides many or all of the other groups/individuals that I identified, you get things like the Wells deal. Talk with enough people in the industry, and you'll hear stories about deals like that for almost every club. It's not just the Angels. There are many factors as to why it happens. And it does happen in every organization.
  10. His mental makeup is off the charts, like that of Jam Jones. Both of them are mature beyond their years, especially in terms of understanding the game, and the necessary work they need to put in to be successful at it. Every scout I've talked to about them always talk about that as one of their defining characteristics, and keys to their success.
  11. Welcome aboard Steve! Good first article. I'm looking forward to reading more of your stuff.
  12. Eppler also talked about how much of an important part of the club that Ohtani is and that they always want to have as much of the 25 man roster that left Spring Training together. Eppler didn't want to speak on behalf of Ohtani or put words in his mouth, but knows that not playing doesn't sit well with Ohtani's hunger to play the game. That is pretty much how the presser ended.
  13. Eppler was asked if Ohtani had received any other treatments. Eppler said that Ohtani has received the biological treatments from 3 weeks ago and nothing since.