eaterfan

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eaterfan last won the day on January 25 2015

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  1. Stanton wants out if they rebuild

    Even if he ages better, Pujols was so far above Stanton to start with that it makes it risky. If Stanton drops off by half as much as Pujols did then he's basically the bad AP. Stanton put up his highest OPS+ this season, 165. AP had 7 seasons higher than that before he came to the Angels. That's before taking into account injury history. Stanton rarely plays 150 games or more (2 times in his career). Through his age 28 season Pujols only had 2 seasons when he didn't play 150 games. Even if we leave all that aside, "better than the Pujols contact" shouldn't be the goal. It may be the worst contract in baseball history in terms of surplus $ paid out over production created. There is a huge gap between "better than the Pujols contact" and a good move.
  2. Stanton wants out if they rebuild

    Weaver was a pretty bad signing.
  3. Stanton wants out if they rebuild

    Not to mention his defense is nearly Simmons good.
  4. Stanton wants out if they rebuild

    I wasn't the ones who called it a Pujolsian drop off. I was just pointing out that if he followed a a similar aging curve he probably has 2 or 3 more AS calibur years, not 6. If that's the case it's still a horrible contact.
  5. Stanton wants out if they rebuild

    Why do we even have a GM? We should just let Trout make all the personnel decisions.
  6. Stanton wants out if they rebuild

    Agreed. It's a bad argument based on bad math. But if you want to look at good math then there isn't much math that shows any evidence that protection effects an individual hitter's production. There's plenty to show that it remains basically the same. https://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/what-would-lineup-protection-look-like/ Here's an example of that about MCab in 2012. There is also a more comprehensive Tom Tango study in it too.
  7. Stanton wants out if they rebuild

    Trout had his worst month of the season with Upton behind him.
  8. Stanton wants out if they rebuild

    You mean a smart, well run organization wouldn't go after Stanton?
  9. Stanton wants out if they rebuild

    I wouldn't bet on Stanton holding up. He's played 150 games it more only twice in his whole career. I agree that Pujols isn't a great comparison. How about Josh Hamilton? Athletic, big power, injury prone. Drugs certainly got the early part of his career but he didn't make an AS game after his age 31 season.
  10. Stanton wants out if they rebuild

    No. Pujols made one AS team after his age 30 season. He finished in the top 10 of the MVP race only once after his age 30 season as well. He had a much better track record heading into his age 30 season than Stanton has had too.
  11. The point isn't that it's likely to happen, it's extremely unlikely. Just looking at fatalities isn't a good way to measure it. How about broken bones, concussions, etc.? But that isn't the point. The point is, there is almost no cost to it for the game, fans, or the clubs so any injury prevented is a plus. How many hitters have ever been killed by a pitch in MLB history? Requiring hitters to wear helmets is still a good idea.
  12. Recipe Of The Day: Cauliflower Pasta Bake

    I tried this for the first time a few weeks ago. I put in some olive oil and get a little color on it. Then I add some chicken stock and cook it until the liquid is gone. It's not vegetarian, but it's way fewer calories than rice and had a good taste. Was great with the shrimp I made and with my Thai chicken curry.
  13. Yes. We should stick with "let's not extend an already existing, barely visible net even if it kills a kid because that's the way it's always been" plan.
  14. I've been lucky enough to sit behind home several times in my life. I forget that there is netting there. I think there are a lot of factors that have contributed to the "rise" as a hot topic. 1. Higher exit velocities - The average fastball velocity is up, hitters are stronger, and they've switched the type of wood in bats. This all leads to higher exit velocities and less time to react. 2. Some stadiums have closer seats - Like the first factor, it leads to less time to react as a fan 3. Distractions - Smart phones, HD scoreboards, constant stuff going on 4. More coverage - 50 years ago a few games are on TV. Even 20 years ago not every game was on TV. Now not only is every game on TV but every play is instantly available on Twitter and shared across the world. 50 years ago if someone gets hit in the face unless you were in that fan's section you might read about it in the paper the next day. 20 years ago you might see it on your local news at night or perhaps the 10 PM Sports Center. Now it's on your phone instantly. 5. People care about this stuff now - Maybe we were stupid for not caring about it before. When I was a kid 25 years ago (before cell phones) my dad took 2 of my friends and me to a game. We were about even with 1st base about 7 rows back. Dave Winfield (with the Twins) pulled a line drive foul ball. There was no getting out of the way of it. The guy 2 rows back and 2 seats over got drilled in the face. Didn't matter he wasn't distracted. He wasn't a kid. It just happens sometimes.
  15. Are people arguing it's a good idea for baseball to discourage people bringing children to the good seats? I thought baseball was trying to increase interest among young fans.